Categories
writing

“Kurt Vonnegut’s Seasons” in The Drift

The Drift is a great new magazine, and one of their sections I adore is Mentions, where writers offer reviews under 100 words. I have one in their latest issue on Kurt Vonnegut’s seasons, which you can read here.

Categories
writing

Review of Gina Nutt’s ‘Night Rooms’ in Heavy Feather

I reviewed Gina Nutt’s fantastic essay collection Night Rooms for Heavy Feather Review. You can read it here.

Categories
film writing

“Murder Mystery” in Oyez Review

I have a new essay/art/film criticism hybrid thing in the latest issue of Oyez Review. I look at each character in the 2019 film Knives Out for how they represent whiteness. I had a lot of fun with this one, and you can read/look at it here.

Categories
film writing

“Offscreen” in Postscript Magazine

I have a new essay of film criticism in the latest issue of Postscript Magazine. In it, I examine Spring Breakers as a film that does or doesn’t interrogate whiteness, and how that ambiguity is too costly in light of the white American inability to see whiteness onscreen. You can read it here.

Categories
writing

“A Man Who Literally Goes to Therapy” in Lunch Ticket

I have a new blog on Lunch Ticket that I am very proud of. I talk about my experience with therapy and how I wish for every person, especially men, to seek help. You can read it here.

Categories
writing

“Some Notes on Enchantment” in HASH Journal

I have a new essay on the 2019 film The Lighthouse in HASH Journal, a new publication that I adore. This essay is part of my ongoing series on film and whiteness, all of which can be found on my Published Work page.

You can read the essay here.

Categories
writing

“Saving the Suburbs” in Newfound

I have a new review in the latest issue of Newfound. In it, I look at Jason Diamond’s book The Sprawl: Reconsidering the Weird American Suburbs in conversation with the 2017 film Suburbicon. You can read the review here, and better yet, you can read the entire issue.

Diamond’s The Sprawl is available through Coffee House Press.

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Uncategorized

Some Writing Around the Web

I had a number of things published in the past few days around the web:

For the Lunch Ticket blog, I wrote about what it means to sit alone in my room listening to music and how it connected me to the wider world. You can read it here.

For Issue IV of Variety Pack, I wrote a review essay about some books that have helped me learn how to grieve in a nation that does not grieve well. I considered Marion Winik’s The Big Book of the Dead, alongside Camus’ The Plague, Jesmyn Ward’s Men We Reaped, and Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking.

For The Adroit Journal, I reviewed Melissa Valentine’s wonderful memoir The Names of All the Flowers, which has stayed with me since I read it last July.

Thanks to all of you who choose to read.

– Ben

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Uncategorized

“Once Again, the Western” in New Critique

I have a new essay, “Once Again, the Western” published in New Critique. In it, I consider Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood and how Quentin Tarantino, who once made a movie about Nazi-hunting, cannot face the Nazis of today because he shares in their anxiety.

This essay is the third in my series of what I refer to as Western Expansions, in which I consider the half-life of the Western film genre. The first, “No True West,” was published in Bridge Eight Press, and the second, “The Lone Star,” was published in No Contact Mag. Both can be found in Published Work.

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Uncategorized

I Still Hear You: The Best of 2020

I realized I forgot to post this here, and I wanted to include it for anyone out there who may be reading but does not follow me on social media. In 2013, I began to blog about my favorite albums of the year right here. I’ve done it every year since.

At the start of a new decade, I decided to take it offline, to resist the ease of technology and create more spaces to connect with people in real life. This year, the only way to read about my favorite albums is through a physical zine, with roughly 400 words per 15 albums. I Still Hear You: A Listener’s Guide to 2020 is the most intimate writing on music I’ve done to this point.

If you would like a copy, I have asked for a donation to Texas Jail Project, an organization committed to honoring the humanity of incarcerated persons. You can send me your donation through Venmo (@benjamintaylor) with your address as the comment. I will send 100% of your donation along to TJP and the zine to your home.

Here is my playlist of the songs that saw me through 2020.